Cafe Scientifique: “Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care”

December 2, 2014

Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care

Follow along with the slideshow here.

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn

Adjunct Professor
University of Pittsburgh

Additive Manufacturing, or 3D Printing, is a hotbed of modern innovation and entrepreneurial activity that is beginning to affect nearly every facet of our lives. Dr. Howard A. Kuhn will trace the evolution of the technology and illustrate the seemingly infinite array of geometrical features this technology makes possible. Kuhn will describe and display a variety of current and emerging applications, with emphasis on uses of additive manufacturing in the biomedical field.

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn is an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, teaching courses in manufacturing, product realization, entrepreneurship, and additive manufacturing. He also conducts research on additive manufacturing of biomedical devices for tissue engineering at the university. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, Dr. Kuhn serves as technical adviser for the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute. He is also research consultant at The Ex One Company, developing materials, processes and equipment for additive manufacturing of metal and ceramic components by three-dimensional printing.

Recorded Monday, December 1st, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Scientifique Q&A: “Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care”

December 2, 2014

*This is the Q&A portion of Dr. Kuhn's presentation.

Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn

Adjunct Professor
University of Pittsburgh

Additive Manufacturing, or 3D Printing, is a hotbed of modern innovation and entrepreneurial activity that is beginning to affect nearly every facet of our lives. Dr. Howard A. Kuhn will trace the evolution of the technology and illustrate the seemingly infinite array of geometrical features this technology makes possible. Kuhn will describe and display a variety of current and emerging applications, with emphasis on uses of additive manufacturing in the biomedical field.

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn is an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, teaching courses in manufacturing, product realization, entrepreneurship, and additive manufacturing. He also conducts research on additive manufacturing of biomedical devices for tissue engineering at the university. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, Dr. Kuhn serves as technical adviser for the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute. He is also research consultant at The Ex One Company, developing materials, processes and equipment for additive manufacturing of metal and ceramic components by three-dimensional printing.

Recorded Monday, December 1st, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Sci: “The Beginning of the Universe… and Dust in Our Galaxy”

November 12, 2014

Dr. Arthur Kosowsky

Professor of Physics and Astronomy
University of Pittsburgh

 

"The Beginning of the Universe... and Dust in Our Galaxy"

Arthur Kosowsky, a top expert in cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, will speak about a new discovery made using the BICEP telescope at the South Pole earlier this year. A team of physicists noticed a subtle change in the CMB, which is hypothesized to be the result of gravitational waves by a sudden cosmic expansion during the very earliest moments of the universe. Despite the buzz this discovery has generated, more analysis is needed to determine whether the signal is evidence of the first moments of the universe, or whether it has a much more local source – such as dust grains in our own galaxy, aligned by magnetic fields. More data will be required to determine the cause of the change. If the signal is indeed from the first moments of the universe, it opens a remarkable window into physics at a scale we will never be able to probe with experiments on Earth, and it can tell us what happened when the universe was a trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second old.

Kosowsky will talk about the science behind these ideas, what kinds of observations need to be done to decide the source of what we are seeing in the microwave sky, what this might tell us about the universe, and what kinds of future physics experiments and theories it might prompt.

Arthur Kosowsky is a professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his PhD in physics from the University of Chicago in 1994 and has been on the faculty of Pitt since 2005. He is the author of many scientific papers about the universe, and particularly how the cosmic microwave background radiation tells us about the properties of the universe and about fundamental physics. He is also a member of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) project, which has built a custom-designed 6-meter microwave telescope with superconducting bolometric detectors to observe the microwave sky from the Atacama desert in the Chilean Andes.

Recorded on Monday, November 10th, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Scientifique: “Assuring Urban Forest Health and Sustainability via Tree Genetic Diversity”

October 7, 2014

Dr. Cynthia Morton

Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Curator of Botany

 

Assuring Urban Forest Health and Sustainability via Tree Genetic Diversity

Follow along with the slide show here!

As a botanist, Dr. Cynthia Morton, curator of botany at Carnegie Museum of Natural History, has worked locally and internationally to collect specimens for phylogenetic analysis of molecular and morphological data. The range of projects include redefining the citrus family, constructing genomic maps, cleaning ground water, and investigating park and nursery tree genetics.

Her work in 2008 compared the level of genetic variation in London Plane trees already existing in the Pittsburgh area with trees of the same species currently available from three commercial nurseries. The genetic diversity was far greater in the older urban tree samples compared to the nursery samples, indicating that the nursery industry has been selectively cloning to produce new trees. While cloning trees is in itself a benign practice, doing so on a mass scale without a proper understanding of the implications of drastically reducing the genetic diversity of urban forests is ill-advised. A greater understanding of urban tree genetic diversity will allow policy makers, city planners, environmental agencies, and the nursery industry to make informed decisions and recommendations to improve practices for maintaining a robust tree landscape for the future.

An urban environment rich with trees is highly valued for its aesthetic qualities as well as its environmental benefits, such as reducing summer cooling costs, carbon sequestration, intercepting airborne pollutants, and reducing storm water runoff. In the United States, urban forests are estimated to contain about 3.8 billion trees, with an estimated structural asset value of $2.4 trillion. Billions of federal, local and private dollars are spent annually on management, labor, and the trees themselves as part of tree revitalization projects, and millions more are spent by individual homeowners to improve their environment and property values. Despite this multi-billion dollar urban tree economy, little work has been done to understand urban tree genetic diversity as an issue of vulnerability, or to examine the long-term impacts of urban tree genetic diversity on the sustainability of the urban environment.

Morton's research has been featured in newspapers, videos, and in peer-reviewed scientific articles.

Recorded Monday, October 6, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Scientifique Q&A: “Assuring Urban Forest Health and Sustainability via Tree Genetic Diversity”

October 7, 2014

This is the Q&A portion of Dr. Morton's presentation.

Dr. Cynthia Morton

Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Curator of Botany

 

Assuring Urban Forest Health and Sustainability via Tree Genetic Diversity

As a botanist, Dr. Cynthia Morton, curator of botany at Carnegie Museum of Natural History, has worked locally and internationally to collect specimens for phylogenetic analysis of molecular and morphological data. The range of projects include redefining the citrus family, constructing genomic maps, cleaning ground water, and investigating park and nursery tree genetics.

Her work in 2008 compared the level of genetic variation in London Plane trees already existing in the Pittsburgh area with trees of the same species currently available from three commercial nurseries. The genetic diversity was far greater in the older urban tree samples compared to the nursery samples, indicating that the nursery industry has been selectively cloning to produce new trees. While cloning trees is in itself a benign practice, doing so on a mass scale without a proper understanding of the implications of drastically reducing the genetic diversity of urban forests is ill-advised. A greater understanding of urban tree genetic diversity will allow policy makers, city planners, environmental agencies, and the nursery industry to make informed decisions and recommendations to improve practices for maintaining a robust tree landscape for the future.

An urban environment rich with trees is highly valued for its aesthetic qualities as well as its environmental benefits, such as reducing summer cooling costs, carbon sequestration, intercepting airborne pollutants, and reducing storm water runoff. In the United States, urban forests are estimated to contain about 3.8 billion trees, with an estimated structural asset value of $2.4 trillion. Billions of federal, local and private dollars are spent annually on management, labor, and the trees themselves as part of tree revitalization projects, and millions more are spent by individual homeowners to improve their environment and property values. Despite this multi-billion dollar urban tree economy, little work has been done to understand urban tree genetic diversity as an issue of vulnerability, or to examine the long-term impacts of urban tree genetic diversity on the sustainability of the urban environment.

Morton's research has been featured in newspapers, videos, and in peer-reviewed scientific articles.

Recorded Monday, October 6, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Scientifique: “The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter”

September 4, 2014

Dr. Katherine Freese

George E. Uhlenbeck Professor of Physics
University of Michigan

Author
The Cosmic Cocktail

 

Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter

Dr. Katherine Freese, a pioneer in the study of dark matter, discusses her book, "The Cosmic Cocktail," which documents the inside story of the epic quest to solve one of the most compelling mysteries of modern science – what is the universe made of?

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Cafe Scientifique: “The Age of Radiance”

August 7, 2014

Craig Nelson, Author "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and the Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era"

With a biographer's penchant for detail, author Craig Nelson will chronicle the historical figures of the atomic age, including its "Forgotten Women." His lecture will keep visitors guessing at every turn. Nelson is the author of "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era," "Rocket Men" (a New York Times bestseller), "Thomas Paine: Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Birth of Modern Nations," among other works.

Nelson, a historian, will offer new understanding of the era, focusing on its forgotten heroes and heroines who have impacted all of our lives. For example, Albert Einstein called Lise Meitner, the first female university professor in the history of Germany, "our Curie." The Viennese head of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute's Physics department made one of the great discoveries of modern science on Christmas in 1938: Nuclear fission. But she was written out of history, first by the Nazis for being a Jew, and then by the post-war Germans for being a woman. Heisenberg called her nothing more than an assistant. Her worktable was mounted at Munich's German History Museum and labeled as being the desk of her great antagonist. She was denied the Nobel prize. But the physics community would enact a precise form of eternal vengeance – giving her a spot on the periodic table – while ensuring that her great foe could never achieve this honor.

Learn more about Craig Nelson at www.craignelson.us

Recorded on Monday, August 4, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

00:0000:00

Cafe Scientifique Q&A: “The Age of Radiance”

August 7, 2014

This is the Q&A portion of Craig Nelson's talk, "The Age of Radiance."

With a biographer's penchant for detail, author Craig Nelson will chronicle the historical figures of the atomic age, including its "Forgotten Women." His lecture will keep visitors guessing at every turn. Nelson is the author of "The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era," "Rocket Men" (a New York Times bestseller), "Thomas Paine: Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Birth of Modern Nations," among other works.

Nelson, a historian, will offer new understanding of the era, focusing on its forgotten heroes and heroines who have impacted all of our lives. For example, Albert Einstein called Lise Meitner, the first female university professor in the history of Germany, "our Curie." The Viennese head of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute's Physics department made one of the great discoveries of modern science on Christmas in 1938: Nuclear fission. But she was written out of history, first by the Nazis for being a Jew, and then by the post-war Germans for being a woman. Heisenberg called her nothing more than an assistant. Her worktable was mounted at Munich's German History Museum and labeled as being the desk of her great antagonist. She was denied the Nobel prize. But the physics community would enact a precise form of eternal vengeance – giving her a spot on the periodic table – while ensuring that her great foe could never achieve this honor.

Learn more about Craig Nelson at www.craignelson.us

Recorded on Monday, August 4, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

00:0000:00

Cafe Scientifique: “The Persistence of Memory: How Experience Changes the Brain”

June 9, 2014

Dr. Alison Barth Associate professor Carnegie Mellon University Department of Biological Science

How do our experiences change us? How are memories stored and retrieved?

Scientists believe the answers lie in how connections between neurons, called synapses, can be strengthened or weakened over time. The brain contains about 100 billion neurons and 1 quadrillion synapses, so figuring out which ones are changed during learning is the ultimate needle-in-the-haystack problem. Learn how contemporary neuroscientists are tackling this age-old question, using sophisticated, state-of-the-art techniques for neuronal imaging as well as the recording of tiny electrical impulses from task-related neurons. Figuring out what regulates learning promises new methods to boost memory and improve perception or performance.

Alison Barth, associate professor in Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Biological Science, will give an introduction to brain plasticity, explaining how molecules become linked to the mind. Dr. Barth studies the organization of and plasticity of neocortical circuits in rodents. Her work centers on how synapses are altered by behavioral experience. She's the recipient of numerous awards, and she holds a patent for the fosGFP transgenic mouse. She is an inventor on multiple applications for other neuroscience-related methods and treatments.

Recorded Monday, June 2, 2014, at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

00:0000:00

Cafe Scientifique Q&A: “The Persistence of Memory: How Experience Changes the Brain”

June 9, 2014

This is the Q&A portion of Dr. Barth's presentation.

Dr. Alison Barth Associate professor Carnegie Mellon University Department of Biological Science

How do our experiences change us? How are memories stored and retrieved?

Scientists believe the answers lie in how connections between neurons, called synapses, can be strengthened or weakened over time. The brain contains about 100 billion neurons and 1 quadrillion synapses, so figuring out which ones are changed during learning is the ultimate needle-in-the-haystack problem. Learn how contemporary neuroscientists are tackling this age-old question, using sophisticated, state-of-the-art techniques for neuronal imaging as well as the recording of tiny electrical impulses from task-related neurons. Figuring out what regulates learning promises new methods to boost memory and improve perception or performance.

Alison Barth, associate professor in Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Biological Science, will give an introduction to brain plasticity, explaining how molecules become linked to the mind. Dr. Barth studies the organization of and plasticity of neocortical circuits in rodents. Her work centers on how synapses are altered by behavioral experience. She's the recipient of numerous awards, and she holds a patent for the fosGFP transgenic mouse. She is an inventor on multiple applications for other neuroscience-related methods and treatments.

Recorded Monday, June 2, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

00:0000:00
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