Bridges: Connecting Researchers, Big Data, and High-Performance Computing

March 11, 2016

Nick Nystrom

Director of Strategic Applications, Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

 

Bridges: Connecting Researchers, Big Data, and High-Performance Computing

 

Inferring the causes of disease, tracking the survival of the human race, and enabling natural-language searches of video are just a few of the topics being tackled right here in Pittsburgh at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. Join us as we explore how the center uses big data and data analytics to better understand challenging problems.

As the center's Director of Strategic Applications, Dr. Nick Nystrom and his team develop hardware and software architectures to enable groundbreaking research, engaging in research and collaborations across diverse disciplines. At Café Sci, Nystrom will discuss researchers' use of PSC's newest resources, including "Bridges."

"Bridges" is a data-intensive high-performance computing (HPC) system designed to empower new research communities, bring desktop convenience to HPC, expand campus access, and help researchers facing challenges in Big Data to work more intuitively. Funded by a $9.65 million National Science Foundation award, Bridges consists of three tiers of large-shared-memory resources, dedicated nodes for database, web, and data transfer purposes, high-performance shared and distributed data storage, powerful new CPUs and GPUs, and the new, uniquely powerful interconnection network. From a software perspective, Bridges supports widely-used data analytic software such as R, Java, Python, and MATLAB, integration of Spark and Hadoop with HPC, and virtualization.

Nystrom will discuss the importance of converging Big Data and HPC and how Bridges is bringing HPC to nontraditional users and research communities.

Nystrom is also a research physicist in the Department of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry, Math, and Physics and a PhD in Computational Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh.

 

Recorded on Monday, March 7, 2016 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Sci: “Solid-State Lighting: Energy-Efficient Alternative?”

March 11, 2015
 

Solid-State Lighting: Energy-Efficient Alternative?

Professor Robert F. Davis

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Carnegie Mellon University

In the future, when we flip a light switch, could it turn on a solid-state light, rather than an incandescent or fluorescent bulb?

Incandescent and fuel-based lamps convert less than 5 perfect of the energy they consume into visible light; the remainder emerges as heat. Fluorescent lamps achieve a conversion efficiency of about 30 percent. Each is an engine for converting the earth’s energy resources mostly into waste heat, pollution, and greenhouse gases. The increasingly precious energy resources and the significant threat of climate change demand that we reduce the energy and environmental cost of artificial lighting.

Solid-state lighting is the direct conversion of electricity to visible white light using semiconductor materials and light emitting diodes. It has the potential to be the much-needed energy efficient technology of the future. Currently being tested in some environments, solid-state lighting needs more research, engineering, and technological development to increase efficiency, lower its heat generation, and achieve a light color that’s accurate and pleasing to the human eye.

Robert F. Davis is John and Clare Bertucci Distinguished Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His research interests include: growth and characterization of wide band gap semiconductor thin films and devices; growth and characterization of chemical sensors; and atomic layer deposition of inorganic materials. He has edited or co-edited seven books, authored or co-authored more than 270 chapters in edited proceedings or in books, published more than 400 peer reviewed papers in archival Journals and given more than 170 invited presentations.

Recorded Monday, March 9th 2015 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA

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Cafe Scientifique: “Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care”

December 2, 2014

Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care

Follow along with the slideshow here.

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn

Adjunct Professor
University of Pittsburgh

Additive Manufacturing, or 3D Printing, is a hotbed of modern innovation and entrepreneurial activity that is beginning to affect nearly every facet of our lives. Dr. Howard A. Kuhn will trace the evolution of the technology and illustrate the seemingly infinite array of geometrical features this technology makes possible. Kuhn will describe and display a variety of current and emerging applications, with emphasis on uses of additive manufacturing in the biomedical field.

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn is an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, teaching courses in manufacturing, product realization, entrepreneurship, and additive manufacturing. He also conducts research on additive manufacturing of biomedical devices for tissue engineering at the university. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, Dr. Kuhn serves as technical adviser for the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute. He is also research consultant at The Ex One Company, developing materials, processes and equipment for additive manufacturing of metal and ceramic components by three-dimensional printing.

 

Recorded Monday, December 1st, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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Cafe Scientifique Q&A: “Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care”

December 2, 2014

*This is the Q&A portion of Dr. Kuhn's presentation.

Additive Manufacturing: What It Is, How It Works, and Why We Should Care

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn

Adjunct Professor
University of Pittsburgh

Additive Manufacturing, or 3D Printing, is a hotbed of modern innovation and entrepreneurial activity that is beginning to affect nearly every facet of our lives. Dr. Howard A. Kuhn will trace the evolution of the technology and illustrate the seemingly infinite array of geometrical features this technology makes possible. Kuhn will describe and display a variety of current and emerging applications, with emphasis on uses of additive manufacturing in the biomedical field.

Dr. Howard A. Kuhn is an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, teaching courses in manufacturing, product realization, entrepreneurship, and additive manufacturing. He also conducts research on additive manufacturing of biomedical devices for tissue engineering at the university. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, Dr. Kuhn serves as technical adviser for the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute. He is also research consultant at The Ex One Company, developing materials, processes and equipment for additive manufacturing of metal and ceramic components by three-dimensional printing.

 

Recorded Monday, December 1st, 2014 at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

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